NAACP Seeks Federal Probe After Noose Put On Black Student

October 25, 2016 bcic_admin 0

WIGGINS, Miss. (AP) — The president of the Mississippi NAACP is demanding a federal hate crime investigation after the parents of a black high school student said as many as four white students put a noose around their son’s neck at school.

“No child should be walking down the hall or in a locker room and be accosted with a noose around their neck,” president Derrick Johnson said Monday during a news conference in Wiggins. “This is 2016, not 1916. This is America. This is a place where children should go to school and feel safe in their environment.”

Johnson said the incident happened Oct. 13 near a locker room at Stone High School in Wiggins.

Hollis and Stacey Payton, parents of the alleged victim, attended the news conference but did not speak. Their son, a sophomore football player, was not with them and they did not release his name.

The NAACP said the incident happened during a break in football practice and that the noose was “yanked backward” while on the student’s neck.

Johnson would not say whether noose left any marks on the black student. According to a statement from the student’s family, he returned to football practice after the incident, said Ayana Kinnel, a spokeswoman for the state NAACP.

Stone High has about 800 students, about a quarter of whom are black according to state figures. That’s not a particularly high percentage in Mississippi, where half of nearly 500,000 public school students are African-American.

Wiggins, 35 miles north of the Gulf of Mexico, is a logging town. Many people commute from the 18,000-resident county to jobs in Gulfport and other coastal cities.

Mississippi has struggled with a history of racial division. It is the last state that still incorporates the Confederate battle emblem on its state flag. In 2014, two out-of-state students at the University …read more

Motown Museum In Detroit Plans $50 Million Expansion

October 17, 2016 bcic_admin 0

DETROIT (AP) — The Motown Museum in Detroit is planning a $50 million expansion that will include interactive exhibits, a performance theater and recording studios.

The museum said Monday that the new space will be designed and built around the existing museum, which includes the Motown studio with its “Hitsville U.S.A.” facade.

Robin R. Terry, chairwoman and CEO of the Motown Museum, says in a statement that a goal of the project is to “inspire dreams and serve as an educational resource for global and local communities.”

The Motown Museum is located in the house where record company founder Berry Gordy launched a cultural and commercial music empire. The label started in 1959 and scores of stars and hits were created before it decamped to California in 1972.

Like BlackAmericaWeb.com on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

(Photo Source: AP)

…read more

Study: Minorities Less Likely To Attend Top Public Colleges

October 13, 2016 bcic_admin 0

BOSTON (AP) — A new study of federal data finds that black and Latino students are far less likely to attend top public colleges than their white and Asian peers.

The Center for American Progress think tank reported Thursday that among all black students at U.S. public colleges in 2014, only 9 percent attended highly selective schools. For Latinos, the figure was 12 percent. By contrast, 19 percent of white students and 31 percent of Asians attended top schools.

Blacks and Latinos were more likely to attend community colleges and other schools with lower graduation rates. The Washington, D.C.-based think tank says minorities need greater access to elite schools to close achievement gaps between races.

States where blacks were least likely to attend top schools include North Carolina, Tennessee and Massachusetts.

Like BlackAmericaWeb.com on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

(Photo Source: Thinkstock)

…read more

Attorney General Loretta Lynch Talks Bridging The Gap Between Police & Citizens

October 4, 2016 bcic_admin 0

Your browser does not support iframes.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch is on a 12-city Community Policing tour in conjunction with President Obama’s Presidential Proclamation that designates the week of Oct. 2-8, 2016 as National Community Policing Week.

She talks to the Tom Joyner Morning Show’s political panel Jacque Reid, Roland Martin and Shaun King about the number of cases of unarmed black men killed by police officers and what plans the Department of Justice has to alleviate the situation.

Your browser does not support iframes.

Watch the entire interview above!

Like BlackAmericaWeb.com on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

(Photo Source: Courtesy)

…read more

Two North Carolina A&T Students Killed At Party

October 3, 2016 bcic_admin 0

An off-campus party turned violent in Greenboro, North Carolina this weekend and two North Carolina A&T Students ended up dead. In what was described as an altercation, students Alicia Dieudonne and Ahmad Campbell were shot and later pronounced dead.

MyFox8.com reports:

“None of what happened had to happen,” said the N.C. A&T student who lives at the house where the party took place.

We had a party that happened on the other side of campus. It wasn’t even here. And then what happened was after that party had let out people came over to the house hearing that there was another party and it wasn’t,” he went on to say.

The student, who didn’t want to be identified, said that a large group of people would soon enter the house.

“It got real packed guys had gotten kind of heated. Two guys one of them was my friend and then another guy that I don’t know, they started arguing,” he explained.

The other guy that I didn’t know claimed that my friend had tried to hit him with a bottle and then two of his friends hit my friend,” he continued.

Moments later, he said that three shots rang out.

“It was like doosh, doosh…and that was it,” said Quishon Morgan, N.C. A&T student.

Those shots would eventually hit and later kill both Dieudonne and Campbell.

“This is a really sad day for the families of our victims as well North Carolina A&T State University,” said Captain Nathaniel Davis with the Greensboro Police Department.

The University issued a statement:

Like BlackAmericaWeb.com on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

…read more

Charlotte City Council Blasted Over Police Shooting Reaction

September 27, 2016 bcic_admin 0

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Angry Charlotte residents verbally lashed City Council members for hours, complaining about what they called unaccountable police officers and civilian leaders who have failed to force change as the city marked a week of protests since a police officer fatally shot a black man.

At its Monday night meeting, the council opened the floor to dozens of residents who voiced their opinions about the Sept. 20 shooting of Keith Lamont Scott by Charlotte-Mecklenburg police. Many called on Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Police Chief Kerr Putney and other council members to resign on the seventh day of protests since the shooting.

“It’s going to be rough in these streets until you give justice to our people,” said the Rev. Milton Williams, the final speaker in a three-hour string. “Our city’s in an uproar, and you did not respond.”

Many of the speakers carried signs expressing their anger. One man’s sign called for the repeal of legislation taking effect on Saturday blocking the release of police video without a court order. Many speakers demanded that police release all video footage of the confrontation.

Scott’s family and advocacy groups complain that the department divulged only about three minutes of footage from two cameras. They have urged the police department to release all other video footage it has, as well as audio recordings of communications that could clarify how the situation unfolded. A media coalition is also requesting more footage.

“We have no reason to trust you, and you’re giving us even less,” Khasha Harris told City Council members.

Some speakers brought their children, not only to share in the moment, but in several instances, to address the council. Many in the crowd were brought to tears by the comments of Zianna Oliphant, a child who needed a stool to be seen over the lectern.

“It’s a shame …read more

UMass students, faculty protest cuts

September 16, 2016 bcic_admin 0

At the UMass Boston convocation Thursday, Massachusetts Education Secretary James Peyser elicited boos from faculty and student activists when he called for the state’s public colleges and universities to operate on a “new business model” and quoted industrialist Henry Ford. …read more

Officer In Milwaukee Shooting Joined Force As Teenage Aide

August 18, 2016 bcic_admin 0

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Dominique Heaggan attended grade school in Milwaukee and joined the city’s police force as a teenage aide through a program that aims to recruit young people into law enforcement, including minorities.

Heaggan, identified by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel as the black officer at the center of a fatal shooting that sparked two nights of violence, has lived near the shooting scene since at least 2012 and was assigned to patrol that area after becoming a sworn officer.

Sylville Smith, 23, was shot Saturday after police said he fled from a traffic stop. Authorities have said Smith turned toward the officer with a gun in his hand. A few hours later, violence erupted on the city’s largely black north side, with protesters hurling rocks at police and burning six businesses.

SlyvilleSmithMilwaulkeeAP

An alumni invitation shows Heaggan attended grade school about 10 minutes away from the scene. It’s unclear whether he spent his entire childhood in the area.

Now 24, he joined the Milwaukee Police Department in July 2010 as an aide — essentially an apprentice. As an aide, his responsibilities would have included mostly administrative and clerical duties. Aides are required to complete a college curriculum and a physical fitness program before becoming officers.

Police agencies across the country offer similar programs as a way to recruit future officers and expose minorities to police work in hopes of increasing diversity.

“They may not come into the occupation in the same way people in the majority do,” said Mike Scott, an Arizona State University criminology professor who helped develop the New York City Police Department’s cadet program in the mid-1980s.

MaryNell Regan, executive director of the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission, said the program does not specifically seek minorities but has a goal of “diversity in recruitment.” An online recruiting video linked to …read more

1 314 315 316 317 318 326